Strange Case of Anna Anderson

2.13-Anastasia-In Search of…

Some may say, “What about the DNA evidence?” Such persons are referred to “DNA Evidence NOT Infallible”, the Ersjdamoo’s Blog entry of September 8, 2014.

Questions about supposedly airtight DNA evidence in the case of the Russian imperial family, allegedly “mass murdered” at Ekaterinburg in July 1918, are also published in “Finger points to new evidence: Remains may not be Romanovs'”, by Esther Landhuis. Stanford Report, March 3, 2004: http://news.stanford.edu/news/2004/march3/romanov-33.html

On February 27, 1920, a young woman attempted to take her own life in Berlin by jumping into the Landwehr Canal. The woman was rescued and taken to a mental hospital. Confined there, the woman, “Anna Anderson”, began to claim she was Grand Duchess Anastasia Nikolaevna of Russia, supposed to be already dead due to the fabled July 1918 “mass execution.”

Contrary to what “mass murder” aficionados and DNA evidence fetishists believe, Tsar Nicholas II, Tsarina Alexandra, and their five children – Anastasia among them – were secretly smuggled out of Russia and not “mass executed.” At the port of Odessa, in what is now Ukraine, the Romanovs were taken aboard the British ship, HMS Calypso, on February 16, 1919. From there the ship steamed to Constantinople (Istanbul) and on to Venice, Italy. Along the way, to help disguise the Russian imperial family, Tsarina Alexandra, the Tsarevich Alexei, and Anastasia, disembarked. The other Romanovs – Tsar Nicholas II, and the Grand Duchesses Olga, Tatiana, and Marie – remained onboard the HMS Calypso and eventually made their way to Breslau (Wrocław), the largest city in western Poland. [1]

To facilitate the escape from Ekaterinburg, two members of the Romanov retinue had voluntarily sacrificed their lives in the basement of the Ipatiev “House of Special Purpose.” [1] Their sacrifice helped prop up the “mass murder” fable so beloved by DNA evidence fetishists. (A fetish is an object believed to have supernatural powers, or in particular, a man-made object that has power over others. [2])

Anastasia_Anna

Above you can hopefully see a juxtaposition of the faces of Anastasia (left) and Anna Anderson (right). Besides similar faces, Anastasia and Anna shared distinguishing marks on the shoulder blade, a scar at the base of left-hand middle finger, and a scar on the forehead. [3]

The name “Anastasia” means “the resurrection.” Dr. Sergei Rudnev saw a congenital malformation of the feet, hallux valgus, on Anna Anderson. Anastasia had also suffered the same malformation, along with her sisters. Shura Gilliard, nursemaid to the children of Nicholas and Alexandra, corroborated the match between the feet of Anna and Anastasia. [3]

In 1933, Anna “Anastasia” Anderson was offered hush money. Grand Duke Kyril (Cyril) and Prince Felix Yusopov, assassin of Rasputin, instigated the offer. Anna was furious, and refused the hush money. She said if she had a horsewhip she would give Kyril a lashing. [3]

In late 1940 or early 1941, Anna was personally summoned by Adolph Hitler. In the Reichstag building, Hitler bowed to Anna and addressed her as “Your Imperial Highness”, at least according to Anna. “I have investigated the case,” said the Führer. “I am convinced of your identity.” Hitler allegedly wanted to restore the Romanovs in Russia. (Background: Return of the Vladimirovichi, Ersjdamoo’s Blog entry of September 7, 2014.)

Anna Anderson filed suit in a German court in 1938, attempting to prove her identity. The case dragged on for decades, reminiscent of the “Wards in Jarndyce” case described by Charles Dickens in his novel, Bleak House. In 1959, anthropologist Otto Reche entered the lengthy Anna Anderson court case. He testified that Anastasia and Anna Anderson were one in the same, or that they had been identical twins. The suit was finally settled in 1970, with the court ruling, not that Anderson wasn’t Anastasia, but that she had failed to prove that she was. [4]

Maria Rasputin, daughter of Russian prophet Grigory Rasputin, told the New York Times in 1929 she was convinced Anna Anderson was NOT Anastasia. In 1968, however, Maria visited with Anna and was convinced otherwise: “This is Anastasia,” Maria said. Maria dictated and signed a notarized statement confirming Anna was Anastasia. But then, awhile later, Maria gave an official statement denying ever having recognized Anna. As for Maria’s notarized statement, it apparently was sent to lawyers in Germany. [3]

Anna Anderson and her eventual husband, Jack Manahan, in 1968 received an invitation to Richard Nixon’s 1969 inauguration. For unknown reasons, they decided not to attend. [3]

The British queen came to Charlottesville, North Carolina, by then the home of Jack and Anna, in 1976. Did Queen Elizabeth II notice as she passed through Charlottesville that Anna stood on the route with a flag of the Romanovs and a picture of the Tsar? If the queen did see, she pretended not to. [3]

Ear comparisons were made in Germany in 1977. They found 17 matches between the ears of Anastasia and Anna. In German courts at the time, just 12 matches were enough to confirm identity. [3]

In 1983, Anna was committed to the Blue Ridge Hospital. Jack succeeded in freeing her by means of kidnap, and the couple went on the run. Was there a deeper plot to return Anna to Russia and restore the Romanovs to the throne? At that time, Yuri Andropov, General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, had not been seen in public for months. One of the tabloids quoted a source high-up in intelligence circles: “We can only speculate that the Soviets are poised to replace their Communist leader with their long-lost queen.” [3]

Anna “Anastasia” Anderson died in 1984. Since that time there have been further developments in the strange case of Anna Anderson. The pros and cons of this thought-provoking case are given detailed treatment in a book published in 2007, A Romanov Fantasy, by Frances Welch.

——- Sources ——-
[1] The Rescue of the Romanovs, by Guy Richards. Devin-Adair, 1975
[2] “Fetishism”, Wikipedia, September 14, 2014
[3] A Romanov Fantasy, by Frances Welch. New York: W.W. Norton & Co., 2007
[4] http://kevinrandle.blogspot.com/2005_06_01_archive.html

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About ersjdamoo

Editor of Conspiracy Nation, later renamed Melchizedek Communique. Close associate of the late Sherman H. Skolnick. Jack of all trades, master of none. Sagittarius, with Sagittarius rising. I'm not a bum, I'm a philosopher.
This entry was posted in Anna Anderson, DNA evidence, Romanov family. Bookmark the permalink.

9 Responses to Strange Case of Anna Anderson

  1. Pingback: Here’s To You, Anna Anderson | Ersjdamoo's Blog

  2. Pingback: Anastasia and Le Colonel Chabert | Ersjdamoo's Blog

  3. Pingback: The Franziska Schanzkowska Canard | Ersjdamoo's Blog

  4. Caleb Gee says:

    That picture is actually NOT of Anna Anderson though. It is of a different Anastasia claimant who appeared in Russia in 1922.

  5. Tiina says:

    There have been dozens of Romanov impostors. According to my opinion the most genuine are Anastasia Karpenko, who lived in Omsk and died 1976 and Filipp Semjonov (Aleksei), who died in 1979 in Leningrad. There’s a strong resemblance between Alexei and Semjonov! The facial structure is the same, Anastasia Karpenko resembles Grand duchess Olga (czar’s sister) very much!

    • No. We have identified the family members completely.. Most have been in front of everyone’s faces for a long time, which was intentional. Alexei was Nikolai Chebotarev, who lived in Northern Ireland, died in 1987. Ceclava Czapska/ Maria Nikolaevna Romanova-Dolgoruky (died 1970), Marga Boodts/ Grand Duchess Olga Nikolaevna Romanova (died 1976), Anna Anderson/Grand Duchess Anastasia Romanova-Manahan (died 1984). Tatiana disappeared in the United States after 1939. The Tsar was living in Michigan during WWII (died 1953). The Tsarina was flown from Lvov (then Poland) to Rome in 1939, order by Field Marshal Hermann Goering, Luftwaffe.

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