Cthulhu and the Non-Euclidean Geometries

Howard_Phillips_Lovecraft

One Henry Anthony Wilcox had been troubled by dreams of great Cyclopean cities of titan blocks and sky-flung monoliths. “He talked of his dreams in a strangely poetic fashion; making me see,” wrote H.P. Lovecraft (image), “with terrible vividness the damp Cyclopean city of slimy green stone – whose geometry, he oddly said, was all wrong…” [1]

One Gustaf Johansen, a Norwegian sailor of some intelligence, wrote down in a journal shortly before his untimely death about how he and some ship mates landed on a sunken city which had been heaved to the surface of the Pacific Ocean by an earthquake. Second Mate Johansen knew nothing of the art form known as futurism yet came close to it in his description of the sunken city. Johansen conveyed “broad impressions of vast angles and surfaces” in which “crazily elusive angles of carven rock” at first glance “shewed convexity” and then at second glance “shewed concavity.” Johansen was adamant that he had been “swallowed up by an angle of masonry which shouldn’t have been there; an angle which was acute, but behaved as if it were obtuse.” [1]

Unbeknownst to him, Seaman Johansen had set foot upon the ancient lost city of R’lyeh, where entombed yet still sleeping lay, after vigintillions of years, Mighty Cthulhu! [1] What happened to Johansen and his ship mates on that sunken-city-now-risen of R’lyeh is beyond the purview of such an upright publication as Ersjdamoo’s Blog.

The geometry is “all wrong” as well in a region of Mars called “Cydonia.” There, an eerie face – the “face on Mars” – has been noticed. More to the point, “redundant tetrahedral geometry” has been found in the Cydonia region of Mars, according to Richard C. Hoagland, a former NASA consultant and CBS News advisor. [2]

As reported in the Ersjdamoo’s Blog entry of March 18, 2015, in Antarctica, Archaean mythical resemblances were found to correspond to the evilly famed plateau of Leng in the primal writings. Monstrous perversions of geometrical laws were seen. [3]

Henri_Poincaré

Consider, if you will, the case of one Henri Poincaré (image). A nice enough fellow, Poincaré was absent-minded and wandered off into the maze of Non-Euclidean Geometries. Emerging therefrom, he babbled such incoherencies as the following:

There is an imaginary universe bounded by a circle! The temperature at the center is absolute zero! For those who live in this imaginary universe, the size of everything changes as they move about (but they do not know this). Every object and living thing enlarges as it approaches the center. But they all shrink as they approach the boundary! But because you shrink when you approach the boundary, your steps grow smaller and you can never reach the boundary. This means the imaginary universe only seems to be infinite! Here is a world in which a triangle’s sides would be made out of arcs, and even the parallel lines have a new look. [4]

Undoubtedly Henri Poincaré had gone mad – quite mad.

Torus

Above you can hopefully see a triangle immersed in a saddle-shape plane (a hyperbolic paraboloid), as well as two diverging parallel lines. Parallel lines which diverge!? This seems almost like Cthulhu type thinking and you can hear the chanting in the background: “Ph’nglui mglw’nafh Cthulhu R’lyeh wgah’nagl fhtagn.” (“In his house at R’lyeh dead Cthulhu waits dreaming.” [1])

In 2003 one of those crazy Russians supposedly proved the Non-Euclidean babblings of Henri Poincaré! The “Poincare conjecture is a bold guess about nothing less than the potential shape of our own universe…” [5] We are asked to believe that the universe is some sort of Möbius strip, a surface with only one side and only one boundary.

And notice too how in the image the triangle and the “parallel lines” are immersed in a “saddle-shape plane.” Recall how, in the March 6, 2015 Ersjdamoo’s Blog entry, it was related that an old Mongolian fortune teller had told Ferdinand Ossendowski, “Beware of the man with a head like a saddle. He will strive for your death.” On one level, the man with a head like a saddle appeared in the person of a man coming out of a ravine and riding a Mongolian pony, a Colonel Sepailoff, “the darkest person on the canvas of Mongolian events.” [6] On a deeper level, the old Mongolian fortune teller may have meant the Non-Euclidean Geometries when he warned of “the man with a head like a saddle.”

“In his house at R’lyeh dead Cthulhu waits dreaming.” [1] Dreaming perhaps of the lost Lemuria and its bizarre geometries, suggested by some surviving remnants, the statues on Easter Island?

“That is not dead which can eternal lie,
And with strange aeons even death may die.”
[1]

——- Sources ——-
[1] “The Call Of Cthulhu.”. Lovecraft: Tales. New York: Library of America, 2005.
[2] “Our Friend, The Ether (Part 23)”, Ersjdamoo’s Blog, November 20, 2013. https://ersjdamoo.wordpress.com/2013/11/20/our-friend-the-ether-part-23/
[3] “Math Terror and Jigsaw Puzzles 101”, Ersjdamoo’s Blog, March 18, 2015. https://ersjdamoo.wordpress.com/2015/03/18/math-terror-and-jigsaw-puzzles-101/
[4] “A Non-Euclidean World”, from The Joy of Mathematics, by Theoni Pappas. San Carlos, CA: Wide World Publishing, 1989 (Revised edition).
[5] “Non-Euclidean Geometry”, by Tad Boniecki. August 2009. http://soler7.com/IFAQ/NonEuclideanGeometryNotes.html
[6] “Beasts, Men and Gods”, Ersjdamoo’s Blog, March 6, 2015. https://ersjdamoo.wordpress.com/2015/03/06/beasts-men-and-gods/

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About ersjdamoo

Editor of Conspiracy Nation, later renamed Melchizedek Communique. Close associate of the late Sherman H. Skolnick. Jack of all trades, master of none. Sagittarius, with Sagittarius rising. I'm not a bum, I'm a philosopher.
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One Response to Cthulhu and the Non-Euclidean Geometries

  1. Levi says:

    Interesting! It’s neat to try to imagine what Lovecraft is describing in his fantastical works. Thanks for the depictions.

    Check out my Lovecraft review if you’re interested: http://thestake.org/2015/03/27/the-backlist-h-p-lovecrafts-great-tales-of-horror/

    Take care.

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