Armistice Day Horror

Today, November 11, 2018, marks 100 years since Armistice Day. On November 11, 1918, at 11 a.m., the guns fell silent on the Western Front. Yet even on that very day, between dawn and 11 a.m., there was Armistice Day horror.

The signing of the armistice agreement was announced at 5:45 a.m. on November 11th. Commanding officers on both sides were immediately informed. Even so, in “the ensuing five hours and fifteen minutes, the two sides suffered a combined 10,944 casualties, including 2,738 dead…” [1]

Putting this in perspective, suppose that today, before 11 a.m., we suffered a terrorist attack in which 2,738 people died.

Why did the two sides continue fighting, even when they knew an armistice had been signed? It was to get revenge, to use up leftover ammunition, and to teach the enemy a lesson. [1]

The “lesson” learned from the subsequent Versailles treaty helped launch the career of Adolph Hitler.

Another “lesson” we can learn from the “Great War” is about how a cure for diabetes was delayed by it. Diabetes at that time was a fatal condition, affecting children, for which little could be done. Between the time of the First World War and when an insulin treatment was announced in 1922, thousands of children died. They might have lived, except for the intervention of “The War to End All Wars.” [2]

Sure, remember the brave soldiers who died. But remember also that they died needlessly. The “Great War” ended nothing, and even accelerated the second “Great War.”

——- Sources ——-
[1] “Easy Chair: The Ghosts of Versailles”, by Kevin Baker. Harper’s magazine, November 2018.
[2] “Discovery Interrupted”, by Jeffrey Friedman. Harper’s magazine, November 2018.

 

About ersjdamoo

Editor of Conspiracy Nation, later renamed Melchizedek Communique. Close associate of the late Sherman H. Skolnick. Jack of all trades, master of none. Sagittarius, with Sagittarius rising. I'm not a bum, I'm a philosopher.
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