The Tragedy Of Bacon (Part 6)

Francis “Bacon was trying to re-unite the opposed ends of Christendom, rent apart by the theological controversies and animosities of zealots to whom toleration was intolerable…” Because of the fierce passions involved, there was an utmost need for secrecy. Hence, at every stage of initiation into deeper levels of his secret society, “new and appalling oaths were administered under circumstances designed to work upon the nerves as well as the consciences of candidates.” [1]

“But this secrecy was not to be interminable. The Rosicrucian Fraternity was ordained to exist for 100 years – that is, to about 1680.” (Recall from Part 4 of this series how Francis Bacon had left Cambridge at the age of 15 and that in the Fama Fraternitatis the Rosicrucians refer to their founder as being “but of the age of sixteen years when he came thither.” This would have been around 1577.) By 1680, roughly 100 years after Bacon founded the Rosicrucians, his “cabinet and presses full of MSS [Manuscripts] should have been, by the agency of the brotherhood, perused, revised, perchance translated, and finally published.” [1]

But things did not go according to the plan. What interfered? Manly P. Hall detected that “[f]or some reason not apparent to the uninitiated there has been a continued and consistent effort to prevent the unraveling of the Baconian skein. Whatever the power may be which continually blocks the efforts of investigators, it is as unremitting now as it was immediately following Bacon’s death, and those attempting to solve the enigma still feel the weight of its resentment.” [2]

…a continued and consistent effort to prevent the unraveling of the Baconian skein…

“The name of FRANCIS BACON has been studiously kept in the background, or until recently mentioned but with a slur. In histories where he should play an important part he remains behind the curtain.” [1]

Remaining behind the curtain at a “Masque” staged at Whitehall on February 20, 1613 was Francis Bacon, who produced the performance, The Masque of the Inner Temple and Grayes Inn… or The Marriage of the Thames and the Rhine. (Background: The Tragedy Of Bacon (Part 5)) This masque (or play) was to celebrate the alchemical wedding between Princess Elizabeth and the Elector Frederick V, destined to become the Winter Queen and King of Bohemia. Frederick was the Elector Palatine of the Duchy of W├╝rttemberg, the same region where dwelled the author of The Chemical Wedding of Christian Rosencreutz (published 1616), Johann Valentin Andreae. Rosicrucian publications belong in part to movements surrounding the Elector Palatine and the Bohemian adventure. And that adventure was the outward expression of a religious movement fostered by secret influences promoting a solution of religious antagonisms along mystical lines suggested by Hermetic and Cabalist influences. [3]

——- Sources ——-
[1] “A Prospective Review” (April 1895). Baconiana (Vol. III). Edited by a sub-committee of The Bacon Society. London: Robert Banks & Son
[2] “Bacon, Shakspere, and the Rosicrucians”. From An Encyclopedic Outline of Masonic, Hermetic, Qabbalistic and Rosicrucian Symbolical Philosophy, by Manly P. Hall. Los Angeles: Philosophical Research Society, 1977.
[3] The Rosicrucian Enlightenment, by Frances A. Yates. New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 1996. Originally published 1972.

 

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The Tragedy Of Bacon (Part 5)

In Hamlet, the prince complains of “words, words, words.” The Aristotelian Scholastics jabbered much but their arguments traveled in circles, leading nowhere (much like what passes for “the news” these days). (Background: The Tragedy Of Bacon (Part 4), Ersjdamoo’s Blog, October 25, 2018.)

A veal cutlet is a small portion of veal. A hamlet would be a small portion of hog, bacon in other words.

States Mistress Quickly in The Merry Wives of Windsor: “Hang-hog is Latin for Bacon, I warrant you.” [1]

In Whitehall, on Twelfth Night 1614, a “masque”, The Masque of Flowers, was performed in celebration of the marriage of the Earl of Somerset and Lady Frances, daughter of the Earl of Suffolk. These “masques” were theatrical spectacles, much like plays except the general public was not invited to attend. Francis Bacon had taken a leading role in the production of The Masque of Flowers. Bacon had “a detailed, first-hand knowledge of the genre [i.e., masques]…” [2]

A year before the Twelfth Night performance of The Masque of Flowers, on February 20, 1613, another of these masques was staged at Whitehall: The Masque of the Inner Temple and Grayes Inn… or The Marriage of the Thames and the Rhine. This was given in honor of the wedding of Princess Elizabeth and the Elector Frederick V. [2] The happy couple became sarcastically known as the Winter King and Queen of Bohemia, because their reign lasted only for a relative season. Princess Elizabeth (not to be confused with Queen Elizabeth I) was the Stuart daughter of King James I. Connected with the masque of their marriage is the Rosicrucian manifesto, The Chemical Wedding of Christian Rosencreutz, published in 1616. [3]

The land of the Winter King and Queen was magical while it lasted. Residing at Heidelberg, they were surrounded by mechanical singing fountains and pneumatically-controlled speaking statues. [3]

The Rosicrucian manifesto, The Chemical Wedding of Christian Rosencreutz, connects with the masque given for Princess Elizabeth and the Elector Frederick. I have not yet studied this particular masque, however Dame Frances Yates connects it with the Spear Shaker play, The Tempest, which deals with the love story of an island princess. And so it was to be for the Winter King and Queen of Bohemia, reigning over an avant-garde kingdom floating upon a sea of trouble.

——- Sources ——-
[1] “Bacon, Shakspere, and the Rosicrucians”. From An Encyclopedic Outline of Masonic, Hermetic, Qabbalistic and Rosicrucian Symbolical Philosophy, by Manly P. Hall. Los Angeles: Philosophical Research Society, 1977.
[2] “Introduction”, by Brian Vickers. From Francis Bacon: The Major Works, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1996.
[3] The Rosicrucian Enlightenment, by Frances A. Yates. New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 1996. Originally published 1972.

 

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The Tragedy Of Bacon (Part 4)

Francis Bacon entered Cambridge University when he was about 12-years-old. At the age of 15 he “besought his parents to remove him from Cambridge as he had acquired everything the university was able to teach!” (His “parents” here were his foster parents, Nicholas and Anne Bacon.) In those times, the Aristotelian Scholastics controlled education and discussion went round and round in circles, leading nowhere. The Old Machine (Primum Organum) of Aristotle and the Scholastics needed to be replaced, Bacon realized, by a New Machine (Novum Organum). Otherwise the situation was like in Hamlet, just “words, words, words.” [1]

(As point of reference, see our political discourse of today: “words, words, words,” going in circles and leading nowhere.)

Francis Bacon left Cambridge at the age of 15. “In the ‘Fama Fraternitatis’ the Rosicrucians refer to their founder as being ‘but of the age of sixteen years when he came thither.'” [1]

The “Labours of Vulcan” began with Bacon and continued via the “Invisible Brotherhood” (Invisible College) through works of experimental science in the Royal Society. The word “Freemason” started as a nickname and the Society might as well have been named “Free Gardeners.” In either case it would be thereby admitted that the true object, in accord with the Rosicrucian manifestos, was the Great Instauration or Great Reformation, whether by rebuilding Solomon’s house of wisdom as “masons” or by sowing, grafting, and watering the garden of the soul. [2]

Somehow great paper mills and printing presses fell into the hands of Francis and Anthony Bacon. Thus, despite censorship in the Elizabethan National Security State, the great Baconian literature marched forth, “not in a single file, but in battalions of books” under such masks as Marlowe and Shakespeare. The Baconians “wrote under scores of names, giving the authority of one great name to another.” In short, Francis Bacon (and his assistants) quoted himself as an authority, borrowed from and imitated himself, “and thus created a kind of public opinion in support of his new philosophy.” [2]

Assisting this enterprise were improvements in cryptology: “Ingenious ciphers capable of infinite variations, anagrams, acrostics, ambiguities, and tricks of printing, symbolic language, hieroglyphic and perspective pictures, telegraphy by gestures, motions, &c., completed the equipment of his Invisible Brotherhood.” [2]

——- Sources ——-
[1] The Tragedy of Sir Francis Bacon, by Harold Bayley. London: Grant Richards, 1902. Reprint by ForgottenBooks.com
[2] “A Prospective Review” (April 1895). Baconiana (Vol. III). Edited by a sub-committee of The Bacon Society. London: Robert Banks & Son

 

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The Tragedy Of Bacon (Part 3)

Will Shakspere deserts his wife and child in Stratford and hoofs it to London. There, he gravitates towards the theatre-yard, a place haunted by vagrants, horse thiefs, whoremongers (pimps), and “other idele and dangerous persons.” [1]

Francis Bacon frequents the court of Queen Elizabeth I. Unlike other court hangers-on, Bacon does not advance in preferment. The queen (who is secretly his mother) objects to how young Francis associates with riff-raff, “disturbers of our peace,” “scarping, griping catchpolls, unlettered, rude and shallow.” (But one of the riff-raff, a sometimes amusing oaf called Shakspere, is used as the model for Sir Toby Belch.) [1]

With a deeply religious spirit, Francis Bacon, “the young Red Cross Knight pricked forth to encounter vice, ignorance, and error, and to rescue and defend truth and goodness.” [2]

Early in life, Anthony Bacon (his brother) and Francis “were actively engaged in enlisting recruits of all kinds into their ranks. Here begin the vexed questions as to the connection between Francis Bacon and the Rosicrucians and Freemasons, and their mutual relations.” [2]

The noble Francis Bacon had a problem: mundane matters kept dragging his thoughts down to earth. What was needed were assistants of an (let us say) earthly nature. Hence began the recruiting into the brotherhood of persons having no great learning or talent, but of moderate wit and intelligence. These served as a bulwark against mundane annoyances like money matters and unnecessary correspondence “which so clog and hinder thought” among the more elevated minds. The lower-level members of the brotherhood performed the grunt work of collating, transcribing, and editing of works. In return they were allowed to claim them as their own. Their “names were placed on the title-pages, and they were honoured as authors, a system highly conducive to silence and secrecy.” [2]

Seeing that, as in the Rosicrucian allegory, few could ascend like Icarus with waxen wings, Francis Bacon tried with “cords and ladders” to raise them up. “He must begin his work at the bottom rather than at the top, and build from the very foundations.” At this point modern Masonry seems to arrive (as opposed to the Ancient Rite). “The house [Solomon’s Temple] to be built is not yet finished.” [2]

Belonging to Francis Bacon’s secret society were such relative oafs as “Greene, Peele, Marlowe, and Shakespeare” whose styles are “sufficiently similar to have troubled critics to distinguish between them, and have caused commentators to suppose that the four writers sometimes worked in collaboration.” Unguessed by the commentators is that the four were masks, hiding the true author(s). [1]

——- Sources ——-
[1] The Tragedy of Sir Francis Bacon, by Harold Bayley. London: Grant Richards, 1902. Reprint by ForgottenBooks.com
[2] “A Prospective Review” (April 1895). Baconiana (Vol. III). Edited by a sub-committee of The Bacon Society. London: Robert Banks & Son

 

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The Tragedy Of Bacon (Part 2)

A hidden hand had attempted to obliterate the “FR” between ELIZABETHA and JACOBUS in Canonbury Tower. (Background: The Tragedy Of Bacon, Ersjdamoo’s Blog, October 20, 2018.)

The hidden hand was active elsewhere, upon the tombstone of Sir Thomas Meautys.

On the preliminary page of the 1640 edition of Francis Bacon’s The Advancement Of Learning can be found – standing alone and apart from the context – a Latin sentence. That sentence translates as follows:

The delineation of the tomb of Verulam will follow in succession to that of the most illustrious Meautys.

“Verulam” is Lord Verulam, one of the titles of Francis Bacon. The delineation (deciphering) of Bacon’s tombstone would follow from the encryption key provided on Meauty’s tombstone. Meauty lies buried alongside Francis Bacon (though some say Bacon was secretly buried in Westminster, as would befit the unacknowledged son of Queen Elizabeth I).

All that would be needed to decipher the message on Bacon’s tombstone was the encryption key to be found on Meauty’s tombstone. Alas! With the exception of Meauty’s name, “the whole of the lettering has been obliterated by means of some sharp instrument, the marks of which are still [1902] visible.”

These and other truths about Francis Bacon, “Shakespeare”, and the Rosicrucians are claimed to be well-known in certain circles of Freemasonry.

(Source: The Tragedy of Sir Francis Bacon, by Harold Bayley. London: Grant Richards, 1902. Reprint by ForgottenBooks.com)

 

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The Tragedy Of Bacon

Francis Bacon took out a 99-year lease on Canonbury Tower, about five miles from Charing Cross. On a wall, close under a ceiling in a dark corner, is an inscription consisting of the sovereigns of England since the Norman conquest. It appears to run as follows:

WILL. CON. WILL. RUFUS. HEN. STEPHANUS. HEN. SECUNDUS. RI. JOHN. HEN… RICH. TRES. ED. BINI. RI. TERNUS. SEPTIMUS. HENRY. OCTAVUS. POST. HUNC. ED. SEXT. REG. ELIZABETHA. SOROR. SUCCEDIT FR. JACOBUS. SUBSEQUITUR. CHAROLUS. QUI. LONGO…

Of note is towards the end: “ELIZABETHA” is Queen Elizabeth I; “SUCCEDIT FR” indicates her reign was followed by that of “FR”; the “JACOBUS” which follows means King James I.

The puzzle is, who is this “FR”? We are normally told the reign of Elizabeth was immediately followed by that of King James. Yet there is an “FR” between them.

Francis Bacon lived in Canonbury Tower for an appreciable time. Later, an unknown hand attempted to obliterate the “FR”.

Suppose. Suppose the “Virgin Queen” (Elizabeth) had been secretly married to the Earl of Leicester. And that two unacknowledged sons were born of that union: Francis Bacon, the first-born, and Robert, Earl of Essex. If this be true, then Francis Bacon would have rightfully been Prince of Wales and heir to the throne, and explains the “FR”. This leads to the tragedy of Francis Bacon, that he, knowing his true status, was condemned to go through life hidden from his patrimony.

Francis Bacon reconciled himself to his fate. Ended was his great desire to reign, sublimated by a larger work than majesty: “to wield th’ penne doth ever require a greater minde then to sway the royall scepter.” Not reconciled was his fiery younger brother Robert: “His planne was nothing lesse than mad designe to take possession of th’ Court…”

(Source: The Tragedy of Sir Francis Bacon, by Harold Bayley. London: Grant Richards, 1902. Reprint by ForgottenBooks.com)

 

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Go Set A Watchman

Around 2015 there was much buzz: Harper Lee’s sequel of To Kill A Mockingbird was about to be published! There was anticipation that Harper Lee was going to really sock it to the Evil White Men this time!

The book was published, and oh the cries of agony in some quarters! Atticus Finch, hero of Mockingbird, was revealed to have once belonged to the Ku Klutz Klan (KKK)! Groupthink critics quickly ganged up (as they do) and disparaged Go Set A Watchman.

In the slow-motion world of Ersjdamoo’s Blog, the ponderous Ersjdamoo just finally got around to reading Go Set A Watchman, long after the world had passed by. In the story, Scout has grown up and lives in New York City. She takes a train back to the Alabama county of her youth and is gradually shocked by what has happened there. It is the 1950s, time of the civil rights struggle, and the locals are not taking kindly to newfangled ideas coming from northeastern yankees.

Jem, Scout’s brother, has died. Dill, their childhood companion (who is based on Truman Capote), lives in Europe. We see a few flashbacks from childhood adventures, back in the 1930s when Atticus heroically defended a black man accused of raping a white woman.

But now we see that there are nuances to Atticus. He defended the accused rapist, sure, but only because as a lawyer he believed in equal protection under the law. Atticus turns out to be not an early prototype for wise political correctness, but a strict Constitutionalist who is angry about the evisceration of the 10th Amendment states’ rights guarantee.

The book’s title, Go Set A Watchman, comes from Isaiah 21: 6:

For thus has the Lord said unto me, Go, set a watchman, let him declare what he seeth.

The federal government is not the best watchman: it only gives us bureaucracies and long lines, suggests a character. (Try calling the IRS sometime.) We ourselves are the best watchman, the novel seems to say. Scout is urged by her uncle to stay in the Alabama county and work to change things there rather than flee back to New York City. To her shock, her uncle even points out to her that she herself is a bigot (in the strict meaning of the word) since she holds blindly to a narrow-minded opinion about the people in the county. You can see why groupthink PC reviewers evinced hostility towards Harper Lee’s sequel.

The nexus of the crisis for Scout is her childhood faith in her father being destroyed. At the age of twenty-six she must face the fact that Atticus is human and not a god. Will she flee from her psychological crisis, back to New York City and the comfort of its ideological cocoon? Or will she open her eyes to the good and the bad – the humanness – of the people as they are in the Alabama county?

 

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